organic farming

Wait, did I just get rabies?

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We were in our barn last weekend tidying things up and all of a sudden a dark aerial thing starting swooping down around my head. I ducked and let out a little shriek or maybe it was a swear word or two? So me, being me.... I naturally came to the immediate conclusion that we had rabid bats living in the barn. This is NOT going to be fun, I thought. 

Greg, on the other hand, was all smiles. Yes, he was amused by my theatric response to what I thought was a rabid animal, but turned out to be a pair of overly protective barn swallows. But on the inside, he told me, he was smiling because these little barn swallows signified so much more.

From the moment we said YES to becoming the caretakers for this barn, we've done our absolute best to do right by it. Some farmers 200 years ago took down these trees by hand and constructed this barn piece by piece with nothing more than some hammers and chisels. And somehow, through it all, the barn managed to stay mostly intact. 

When it was given to us, we could never have known what bringing it to our farm would entail. But when I think back on all the stress, and sweat, and hard work, and heavy lifting, and pleas for help to friends and family, and all the time and resources we invested in it, I'm amazed that we didn't give up. But one of the things that kept us going was this vision we shared with the previous owner, which was to let the barn be a barn again.   

Seeing our barn in its full glory this summer with those barn swallows protecting the little nest they made above our tool bench showed us that the barn is fulfilling its purpose, not just for us but to our avian friends too. I think Greg is right... there's something beautiful about this. Don't you, too?

Your Farmers, 
Jenney and Greg

The Real Reason We Write This Blog Every Week

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I went for a walk with a friend this week, and after she mentioned how much she was enjoying reading our newsletters she paused and asked me what a lot of people ask us....Isn't it scary?  I sighed and thought OH MY GOD, YES! 

Her question made me realize that even though we might make this look easy, in reality, it's not.  It takes a lot of vulnerability to write these suckers. 

For example, it took us several months to finally summon the courage to send this newsletter called  "3 Things We Are Most Embarrassed to Admit. "  After we pressed send, we were so nervous to read all the responses that poured in that Greg and I went around and turned off every electronic device in the house (Thanks to all who reached out-your kindness and words of encouragement meant the world to us once our adrenaline finally came down!).

There was another time a that I got cold feet a few minutes before we sent this newsletter out. I called a good friend for reassurance and made her listen while I literally read the newsletter out loud to make sure that admitting that my family skinny dips didn't make me look too crazy (Thanks for listening Mariah!).

So, to answer the question you've probably been wondering: Yes, speaking our truth here can be scary for sure!  But, we do it anyways and here's why:

We show up because we have a hunch that the connections we're building through this newsletter are in service to YOU and OUR community. We want our stories - whether they're the ones that are entertaining, silly, embarrassing or messy - to help connect you to food, to farmers, and to farming.

To our detriment, these connections have become rare these days and have gone missing in most of our lives...and we feel called to do the work to build them back up again, even if it means we have the occasional Friday night freak-out. 

Since we are overcoming our fears, we have to think that you can overcome your fears, too. What is that conversation in your life you're scared of having? Or that next step that you're afraid of taking? We're a lot stronger than we give ourselves credit ourselves for. You might find, like we have, that taking that leap of faith and being vulnerable is SO worth it.

Your farmers, 
Greg and Jenney

A perfect pair: a livestock farmer and a vegetarian

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Last week, we celebrated our 5th wedding anniversary!

Every year on our anniversary, we spend a little time looking through our wedding photos and re-reading our vows. It's a little thing that has become an important tradition, giving us an opportunity to reflect on the year and remember what is most important to us in life. 

Looking back on our wedding this week, we realized that while our vows were different in a lot of ways - Greg talked about the pillars of our love and I cracked jokes about how I was rethinking my vegetarianism - one thing that was the same across both was the promise to support each other in achieving our biggest dreams.  

This farm is by far, our biggest and craziest dream yet. Becoming farmers and life-partners has taught us so much about love and life and we can't wait to see what another 5 years will bring! 

Your Farmers, 
Greg and Jenney

PS- Any marriage/relationship advice you'd like to share? Hit reply to this email and share them with us. We love hearing from you!  

PPS- I know you're wondering if it's true... and I really was a vegetarian for over 15 yrs before I married Greg!

How the farm has changed our marriage

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This week, we hosted 3 separate tours on the farm (phew, that's a new record for us!). So, it's fair to say that this week, we spent a lot of time sharing about the progress we're making here.  We moved a 200-year old barn from down to the road to our property, we've transformed brush and brambles into beautiful healthy pastures, we've improved our farm systems and grown our business faster than we ever could have expected. We are proud of these accomplishments, for sure. And yet, what is probably more impressive and less obvious to even our closest friends and family is all the ways the farm has changed us. 

Our bodies were probably the first thing to change. Callused hands and body strength came within a few weeks. Aches and pains from the near constant physical exertion came within a few a months. Every now and then, there are the blisters, cracking skin, bruises, or tick bites to attend to. Yoga has become a required activity,  instead of a leisure activity.

The other changes are more subtle. As two world travelers who used to spend their savings on overseas adventures, I thought we would eventually get stir-crazy staying put. The truth is, that we find more joy in being at home with our animals than we ever would have imagined.  

We are natural introverts and usually re-charge by spending time alone. But the farm has brought us out of our skins and given us this incredible opportunity to share, educate and inspire. The farm pushes us to show up and be present in our community, even when our deepest instincts tell us to go it alone.

The farm has affected our marriage in ways that we probably can't fully comprehend just yet. Running a business with the person you love most in this world isn't always easy. But it has brought us closer, helped us understand each other more wholly, and appreciate each other's strengths and weaknesses and limitations. It has taught us how to listen to one another and honor those hunches (or gut feelings) we get in the middle of the night that a fence is off or a pig might be farrowing (farm lingo for delivering piglets).

If what Eckert Tolle says is true, and the energy you put out in the world comes back to you, then I think we are in for a pretty spectacular life together here at Stonecrop Farm. Thanks for being on this journey with us. 

Your Farmers, 
Greg & Jenney

PS- We absolutely love hearing from you! What did you think of this newsletter and what would you like to hear more about in future newsletters?